Thursday, 23 June 2016

seo-Content-guidelines

June 23, 2016

What Is SEO Content?
To understand what marketers mean by SEO content, it’s helpful to break down the phrase into its component parts:
  • “SEO” refers to search engine optimization, or the process of optimizing a website so that people can easily find it via search engines like Google.
  • By “content,” we mean any information that lives on the web and can be consumed on the web (more on the various types of content below).
So, putting these two concepts together: SEO content is any content created with the goal of attracting search engine traffic.

  • Keyword Research: If you want to generate traffic through search, it’s best to do keyword research before you start writing. This way, you can focus on keywords for which a certain amount of search volume already exists – in other words, write toward topics that people are already searching for information about.
  • Keyword Optimization: Know where and how to use keywords in your content for maximum searchability. (SEOMoz offers a great guide to on-page optimization.)
  • Content Organization: The content on your site should be organized in a logical way. This is not only good for SEO, it also helps visitors on your site find other related content easily. (The longer they stay on your site, the better.)
  • Content Promotion: Increase visibility to new content you create by sharing it on social networks and building links to your content (both internally and from external sites).

 10 tips for seo content:

1. Choosing the right keywords

Search engines identify your website contents with the help of keywords. These are usually very closely related to the search terms that are entered by the users in search engines. Before writing any topic for websites or blogs, you will need to conduct a thorough research on the keywords that are closely associated with the topic. You could make use of keyword research tools like Google AdWords’ Keyword Tool to find the most popular keywords.

2. Readability


Please remember that you are, first and foremost, writing for your readers and not search engines. You might find it difficult to use some of the popular keywords grammatically, but you cannot really afford to skip it all together. Although search engines look for the keywords in particular, they would want the readers to read quality content. Therefore, you will need to make sure that the content is interesting and adds value to the readers, instead of just stopping it short with overused keywords. Keywords should not stop the content flow.

3. Content relevancy

Make sure that you make use of keywords whilst maintaining the relevancy to your content. Search engines employ a number of methodologies so as to be able to detect content that has been created with the sole purpose to obtain good ranking. Not only will such content become unreadable, but chances are that your website gets blacklisted by search engines.

4. Keyword placement

Overusing keywords is not a good idea, as your readers will know your intentions immediately. Instead of using your keywords all through the content, you could use them more in the starting few paragraphs and as subheadings. In the other parts of your article you can then use alternative synonymous or phrases instead of the keywords.




5. Make short and crisp paragraphs

Users hate reading big blocks of paragraphs. Moreover, chunks of text will make your article look boring. Because of this, they might not even read your post or article completely, which would be a real waste of your time and efforts. The contents will become more readable if the paragraph sizes are restricted within 4 to 5 lines.

6. Use bullets and numbering

Most of your readers are likely to have a short attention span, and they might not be interested in reading the entire content of your article. They would instead prefer skimming through bullet points if they are crisp and concise. Therefore, it would be a good idea to use bullets and numbering whenever possible.

7. Make subheadings

Subheadings can be very helpful in directing readers to the precise points that they are interested in. Moreover, you could also use the keywords as subheadings, so that the flow of reading does not get interrupted.

8. Proper linking

If you have to hyperlink any of your content to some other page, make sure that you explain the relevancy of that page very clearly. If the page you are linking to is not relevant to what you mention in your content, it would surely annoy the readers. You could lose your credibility with those readers, and that is something which is really difficult to regain.

9. Avoid repetitions

Some writers think that they need to reiterate or restate the same information in order to drive the point to the readers. Well, readers are smart enough to understand the information when they read it for the first time. Repetitions might irritate them as they might feel like getting back to square-one even after reading half your article. It is always better to continue with information rather than repeating the same things. You could maybe write your opinion on that point instead of restating it.

10. Proofread your write-up

Unless you have very good typing skills, you are bound to make mistakes while writing. Make sure that you proofread your articles or posts very carefully before publishing them. It would be a good idea to proofread twice to eliminate all the errors in your write-ups.
In addition to all the above points you will need to make your content interesting for the readers. You could interest them more by writing something that has out-of-the-box kind of thinking.

 

Content & Search Engine Success Factors:

Content is king. You’ll hear that phrase over and over again when it comes SEO success. Indeed, that’s why the Periodic Table Of SEO Success Factors begins with the content “elements,” with the very first element being about content quality.
Get your content right, and you’ve created a solid foundation to support all of your other SEO efforts.

Cq: Content Quality

More than anything else, are you producing quality content? If you’re selling something, do you go beyond being a simple brochure with the same information that can be found on hundreds of other sites?
Do you provide a reason for people to spend more than a few seconds reading your pages?
Do you offer real value, something of substance to visitors, that is unique, different, useful and that they won’t find elsewhere?
These are just some of the questions to ask yourself in assessing whether you’re providing quality content. This is not the place to skimp since it is the cornerstone upon which nearly all other factors depend.

Cr: Content Research / Keyword Research

Perhaps the most important SEO factor after creating good content is good keyword research. There are a variety of tools that allow you to discover the specific ways that people may be searching for your content.
You want to create content using those keywords, the actual search terms people are using, so you can produce content that effectively “answers” that query.
For example, a page about “Avoiding Melanoma” might use technical jargon to describe ways to prevent skin cancer. But a search engine might skip or not rank that page highly if people are instead searching for “skin cancer prevention tips”. Your content needs to be written in the right ‘language’ – the language your customer or user is using when searching.

Cw: Content Words / Use Of Keywords

Having done your keyword research (you did that, right?), have you actually used those words in your content? Or if you’ve already created some quality content before doing research, perhaps it’s time to revisit that material and do some editing.
Bottom line, if you want your pages to be found for particular words, it’s a good idea to actually use those words in your copy.
How often? Repeat each word you want to be found for at least five times or seek out a keyword density of 2.45%, for best results.
No no no, that was a joke! There’s no precise number of times. Even if “keyword density” sounds scientific, even if you hit some vaunted “ideal” percentage, that would guarantee absolutely nothing.
Just use common sense. Think about the words you want a page to be found for, the words you feel are relevant from your keyword research. Then use them naturally on the page. If you commonly shift to pronouns on second and further references, maybe use the actual noun again here and there, rather than a pronoun.

Cf: Content Freshness

Search engines love new content. That’s usually what we mean when we say ‘fresh’.
So you can’t update your pages (or the publish date) every day thinking that will make them ‘fresh’ and more likely to rank. Nor can you just add new pages constantly, just for the sake of having new pages, and think that gives you a freshness boost.
However, Google does have something it calls “Query Deserved Freshness (QDF)”. If there’s a search that is suddenly very popular versus its normal activity, Google will apply QDF to that term and look to see if there’s any fresh content on that topic. If there is, that new or fresh content is given a boost in search results.
The best way to think about this is a term like ‘hurricane’. If there’s no active hurricane, then the search results will likely contain listings to government and reference sites. But if there’s an active hurricane, results will change and may reflect stories, news and information about the active hurricane.
If you’ve got the right content, on the right topic when QDF hits, you may enjoy being in the top results for days or weeks. Just be aware that after that, your page might be shuffled back in search results. It’s not that you’ve done anything wrong. It’s just that the freshness boost has worn off.
Sites can take advantage of this freshness boost by producing relevant content that matches the real-time pulse of their industry.

Cv: Vertical Search

The other factors on this table cover success for web page content in search engines. But alongside these web page listings are also often “vertical” results. These come from “vertical” search engines devoted to things like images, news, local and video. If you have content in these areas, it might be more likely to show up within special sections of the search results page.
Not familiar with “vertical search” versus “horizontal search?” Let’s take Google as an example. Its regular search engine gathers content from across the web, in hopes of matching many general queries across a broad range of subjects. This is horizontal search, because the focus is across wide range of topics.
Google also runs specialized search engines that focus on images or news or local content. These are called vertical search engines because rather than covering a broad range of interests, they’re focused on one segment, a vertical slice of the overall interest spectrum.
When you search on Google, you’ll get web listings. But you’ll also often get special sections in the results (which Google calls “OneBoxes”) that may show vertical results as deemed relevant.
Having content that performs well in vertical search can help you succeed when your web page content doesn’t. It can also help you succeed in addition to having a web page make the top results. So, make sure you’re producing content in key vertical areas relevant to you. For more information, see some of our related categories:

Ca: Direct Answers

Search engines are increasing trying to show direct answers within their search results. Questions like “why is the sky blue” or “how old is Barack Obama” might give you the answer without needing to click to a web page.
Where do search engines get these answers? Sometimes, they license them, such as with menus or music lyrics. Other times, they draw them directly off web pages, providing a link back in the form of a credit.
There’s some debate over whether having your content being used as a direct answer is a success or not. After all, if someone gets the answer they need, they might not click, and what’s the success in that?
We currently consider sites being used as direct answer sources to be a success for two main reasons. First, it’s a sign of trust, which can help a site for other types of queries. Second, while there’s concern, there’s also some evidence that being a direct answer can indeed send traffic.
For more about direct answers, see our related categories:

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Content Marketing Tools:
 Prezi:
Let’s be honest – most slideshow presentations suck, but Prezi helps you make presentations people will actually want to watch.
Cost: $59/year
 Powtoon:
Powtoon lets you create animated elements for your slideshows quickly and easily, bringing a touch of finesse that most PowerPoints lack.
Cost: Free for limited use; pro plans start at $59/month
Blog Topic Generator:
Stuck for ideas on what to blog about? Then try HubSpot’s Blog Topic Generator, which does pretty much exactly what you’d expect it to do.
Cost: FREE
Content Idea Generator:
Similar to HubSpot’s Blog Topic Generator, Portent’s Content Idea Generator helps you quickly come up with ideas for new content projects simply by plugging in a general topic.
Cost: FREE
 Trello:
Trello is a godsend for large or distributed content teams working to a shared editorial calendar by simplifying the editorial workflow process into nice easy boards. Seriously, check it out.

Cost: Free for limited use; pro plans start at $8.33/month
Feedly:
Many a marketer mourned the loss of Google Reader (RIP), but Feedly is just as good – if not better. Stay on top of the day’s news and must-read content with this awesome RSS app.
Cost: Free for personal use; pro plans start at $5.41/month
 CoSchedule:
Another scheduling/editorial calendar tool, CoSchedule also offers some nifty free content tools like its Headline Analyzer. Well worth a look for small teams.
Cost: Plans start at $15/month
 After the Deadline:
Not all content teams can afford the luxury of hiring a dedicated copyeditor, which is what makes After the Deadline so awesome. This free Chrome plugin checks your grammar, spelling, and everything else you need to keep an eye on before hitting “Publish.”
Cost: FREE
 Polar:
Adding interactive elements like online polls can be a great way to make your content more engaging. Polar makes adding polls to your content a snap, and it has a really intuitive interface, so you don’t need mad coding skills to get started.
Cost: FREE
 SlideShare:
For marketers who do a lot of conference presentations or webinars, SlideShare is the other social network. Create awesome slide decks, then share them on SlideShare with your audience – simple.
Cost: FREE
 PlaceIt:
Ever wanted to put screenshots of your product into stock imagery, but lack Photoshop skills? Now you can with PlaceIt, an easy way to customize images with your own branding and product stills. It also features video integration, which looks awesome.

Cost: FREE


 Canva:
Canva lets you create stylish, striking visuals for social media posts and content projects with an effortless drag-and-drop interface. You can upload your own assets to work with (for free), or pay a small fee to use Canva’s own library of visual materials.
Cost: Free for limited use; pro plans start at $12.95/month
Share As Image:
A really nifty tool for content marketers, Share As Image lets you add text to any image on the web for fast, easy social sharing of visual content. Just be sure to get permission to use images you find online before including them in your campaigns.
Cost: Free for limited use; pro plans start at $8/month
 Piktochart:
Long gone are the days when you needed to hire an expensive graphic design specialist to create beautiful infographics. Piktochart is an awesome free tool that lets you start designing infographics, presentations and more in minutes. Well worth bookmarking.
Cost: FREE
Tableau Public:
Incorporating data visualization into your content projects is a near-guaranteed way to make them stickier and really pop when it comes to illustrating complex topics. Tableau Public is an amazingly powerful, completely free data visualization tool that lets you create incredible interactive visualizations. Amazing.

Cost: FREE
The Readability Test Tool:
Nailing the style and tone of your content is crucial. To check if your latest post is a little on the wordy side, check out The Readability Test Tool, which evaluates web pages according to the Flesch Kincaid Reading Scale.
Cost: FREE
Quora:
It might not seem like a content marketing tool, but Quora can be invaluable for crowdsourcing answers to your questions. Many content marketers use Quora to find quotes, explain complex topics, and other ways to make their content more accessible.
Cost: FREE
OmmWriter:
Hate drafting in Word? Need to eliminate distractions while you’re blogging? Then give OmmWriter a try. This minimalist writing environment strips away everything between you and that all-important first draft, giving you the time and space to get more done.

Cost: FREE
Evernote:
Personally, I favor the hundreds-of-bookmarks-organized-into-folders approach to research, but if this sounds like too much hassle, give Evernote a try. This powerful free app lets you save virtually anything you find online to a personalized folder system synced across all your devices – awesome.
Cost: FREE


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