Saturday, 27 August 2016

CTR AND OTHER GOOGLE ADWORDS IMPORTANT TERMS

August 27, 2016

Impressions: Definition:
How often your ad is shown. An impression is counted each time your ad is shown on a search result page or other site on the Google Network.
  • Each time your ad appears on Google or the Google Network, it's counted as one impression.
  • In some cases, only a section of your ad may be shown. For example, in Google Maps, we may show only your business name and location or only your business name and the first line of your ad text.
  • However, when someone searches using Google Instant, an impression can be counted when one of these occur:
  • Person begins to type and then clicks anywhere on the page like a search result, ad, or related search
  • Person types a search and then clicks the "Search" button, presses Enter, or selects a predicted query from the drop-down menu
  • Person stops typing, and the results are displayed for a minimum of three seconds
  • You'll sometimes see the abbreviation "Impr" in your account showing the number of impressions for your ad.
Click through rate (CTR): Definition:
   A ratio showing how often people who see your ad end up clicking it. CTR can be used to gauge how well    your keywords and ads are performing.
·          CTR is the number of clicks that your ad receives divided by the number of times your ad is shown: 
        clicks ÷ impressions = CTR. For example, if you had 5 clicks and 1000 impressions, then your CTR would be   0.5%.

  

                      (Total Clicks on Ad) / (Total Impressions) = Click Through Rate
  
·          Each of your ads and keywords have their own CTRs that you can see listed in your account.
·           A high CTR is a good indication that users find your ads helpful and relevant. CTR also contributes to your  keyword's expected CTR (a component of Quality Score), which can affect your costs and ad position. Note  that a good CTR is relative to what you're advertising and on which networks.
·          You can use CTR to gauge which ads and keywords are successful for you and which need to be improved.  The more your keywords and ads relate to each other and to your business, the more likely a user is to click on  your ad after searching on your keyword phrase.

Setting Up Google AdWords Terms :


1. Campaign - An ad campaign on Google AdWords is made up of your ad groups, and has the same budget, campaign type and your other ad settings. It’s generally what you first set-up when you advertise, and it helps you organize your different paid advertising efforts. You can run multiple campaigns at any time from your Google account.
2. Ad groups - An ad group is your set of keywords, budgets and targeting methods for a particular objective, within the same campaign. For example, if you are running an ad campaign for a shoe sale, you could set up ad groups to target for online sales, women’s shoes and men’s shoes. You can have multiple ads in each ad group.
3. Campaign Type - Your campaign type is where you want your ads to be seen. Google has:
  • “Search Network only” (which means Google search only)
  • “Display Network only” (which means your ad shows up in Google’s Display network of websites, videos, YouTube, Blogger and more. This is also known as AdSense)
  • “Search Network with Display Select” (which is a combo of search and display)
If you have a Google Merchant Center account and want to use Product Listing Ads, you can also choose “Shopping” as a campaign type.
4. Keywords - Keywords are very important in your Google Ads. They are the words or word phrases you choose for your ads, and will help to determine where and when your ad will appear. When choosing your keywords, think like your customer and what they would be searching for when they want your product, service or offer. Though you can include as many as you like, I suggest a maximum of twenty keywords.
Here’s Google’s explanation on how to build the best keyword list:
5. Quality Score - A quality score is the measurement from Google based on the relevancy of your ad headline, description, keywords and destination URL to your potential customer seeing your ad. A higher Quality Score can get you better ad placement and lower costs.
6. Impressions - An impression is the measurement of how many times your ad is shown.
7. Ad Rank - Your Ad Rank is the value that’s used to determine where your ad shows up on a page. It’s based on your Quality Score and your bid amount.
8. Mobile ad - Mobile ads are what your mobile searchers see on their devices. Google AdWords has WAP mobile ads and “ads for high-end mobile devices”.
9. Ad extensions - Ad extensions are extra information about your business, such as your local address, phone number, and even coupons or additional websites. They’re what shows up in blue below your ad descriptions.
General Ad Related Terms


10. Call to Action (CTA) - A CTA is literally the action you want your searcher to take. Good CTAs in your ads are short, action oriented words such as “Buy”, “Get”, “Act Now”, etc.
11. Click Through Rate (CTR) - Your CTR is an important metric in your account settings. It measures how many people who have seen your ad click through to your link destination.
12. Landing Page - Your landing page is the page on your website to which you’re driving traffic from your ad.
13. Optimization - Optimization in Google AdWords is like optimization elsewhere in marketing. It means making the changes in your ad that get you higher results for your objectives.
14. Split Testing - Split testing includes A/B and multivariate testing. It’s a method of controlled marketing experiments with the goal being to improve your objective results (such as higher CTR’s, increased conversion or even better Ad Ranking).
Cost Related Terms


15. Bid Strategy - Your bid strategy is basically how you set your bid type to pay for viewer interaction with your ads.
16. Daily budget - Your daily budget is what you’re willing to spend per day per ad.  Your daily cost is based on a daily average per month, so don’t be alarmed if yours varies from day to day.
17. CPC - Cost-Per-Click is the most common bid type on Google AdWords. It means you pay every time a person actually clicks on your ad. You set your “maximum CPC” in the bidding process, which means that dollar amount is the most you’ll pay for a click on your ad.
18. PPC - Pay-Per-Click is the same as CPC.
19. CPM - Cost-Per-thousand impressions is a bidding method that bases your costs on how many times your ads are shown (impressions).
20. Billing Threshold - Your billing threshold is the level of spending that triggers a charge to you for the ad costs. It applies to automatic payments, and the threshold level starts at $50. It you reach that within 30 days, you’ll be billed, and your threshold then raises to $100 and so on.


Ad Creative Terms :


21. Headline - Your ad headline is the header of your ad copy.  It generally shows up in blue when your ad is live.
22. Destination URL - Your destination URL is the landing page your ad is directed to when it’s clicked. Your destination site can be a specific page. You can change it for differing ads within ad groups. Your audience does not see it in the ad.
23. Display URL - Your display URL is what shows up in your ad copy. You can keep this simple and clean to increase your brand recognition, trust, and conversions.
24. Side ad - A side ad is the ad  that  show up on the right hand side of a search engine results page (SERP).
25. Top ad - A top ad is the ad that shows up in a shaded box above the organic search results.



Setting Up Google AdWords Terms :


1. Campaign - An ad campaign on Google AdWords is made up of your ad groups, and has the same budget, campaign type and your other ad settings. It’s generally what you first set-up when you advertise, and it helps you organize your different paid advertising efforts. You can run multiple campaigns at any time from your Google account.
2. Ad groups - An ad group is your set of keywords, budgets and targeting methods for a particular objective, within the same campaign. For example, if you are running an ad campaign for a shoe sale, you could set up ad groups to target for online sales, women’s shoes and men’s shoes. You can have multiple ads in each ad group.
3. Campaign Type - Your campaign type is where you want your ads to be seen. Google has:
  • “Search Network only” (which means Google search only)
  • “Display Network only” (which means your ad shows up in Google’s Display network of websites, videos, YouTube, Blogger and more. This is also known as AdSense)
  • “Search Network with Display Select” (which is a combo of search and display)
If you have a Google Merchant Center account and want to use Product Listing Ads, you can also choose “Shopping” as a campaign type.
4. Keywords - Keywords are very important in your Google Ads. They are the words or word phrases you choose for your ads, and will help to determine where and when your ad will appear. When choosing your keywords, think like your customer and what they would be searching for when they want your product, service or offer. Though you can include as many as you like, I suggest a maximum of twenty keywords.
Here’s Google’s explanation on how to build the best keyword list:
5. Quality Score - A quality score is the measurement from Google based on the relevancy of your ad headline, description, keywords and destination URL to your potential customer seeing your ad. A higher Quality Score can get you better ad placement and lower costs.
6. Impressions - An impression is the measurement of how many times your ad is shown.
7. Ad Rank - Your Ad Rank is the value that’s used to determine where your ad shows up on a page. It’s based on your Quality Score and your bid amount.
8. Mobile ad - Mobile ads are what your mobile searchers see on their devices. Google AdWords has WAP mobile ads and “ads for high-end mobile devices”.
9. Ad extensions - Ad extensions are extra information about your business, such as your local address, phone number, and even coupons or additional websites. They’re what shows up in blue below your ad descriptions.
General Ad Related Terms


10. Call to Action (CTA) - A CTA is literally the action you want your searcher to take. Good CTAs in your ads are short, action oriented words such as “Buy”, “Get”, “Act Now”, etc.
11. Click Through Rate (CTR) - Your CTR is an important metric in your account settings. It measures how many people who have seen your ad click through to your link destination.
12. Landing Page - Your landing page is the page on your website to which you’re driving traffic from your ad.
13. Optimization - Optimization in Google AdWords is like optimization elsewhere in marketing. It means making the changes in your ad that get you higher results for your objectives.
14. Split Testing - Split testing includes A/B and multivariate testing. It’s a method of controlled marketing experiments with the goal being to improve your objective results (such as higher CTR’s, increased conversion or even better Ad Ranking).
Cost Related Terms


15. Bid Strategy - Your bid strategy is basically how you set your bid type to pay for viewer interaction with your ads.
16. Daily budget - Your daily budget is what you’re willing to spend per day per ad.  Your daily cost is based on a daily average per month, so don’t be alarmed if yours varies from day to day.
17. CPC - Cost-Per-Click is the most common bid type on Google AdWords. It means you pay every time a person actually clicks on your ad. You set your “maximum CPC” in the bidding process, which means that dollar amount is the most you’ll pay for a click on your ad.
18. PPC - Pay-Per-Click is the same as CPC.
19. CPM - Cost-Per-thousand impressions is a bidding method that bases your costs on how many times your ads are shown (impressions).
20. Billing Threshold - Your billing threshold is the level of spending that triggers a charge to you for the ad costs. It applies to automatic payments, and the threshold level starts at $50. It you reach that within 30 days, you’ll be billed, and your threshold then raises to $100 and so on.









Ad Creative Terms   :


21. Headline - Your ad headline is the header of your ad copy.  It generally shows up in blue when your ad is live.
22. Destination URL - Your destination URL is the landing page your ad is directed to when it’s clicked. Your destination site can be a specific page. You can change it for differing ads within ad groups. Your audience does not see it in the ad.
23. Display URL - Your display URL is what shows up in your ad copy. You can keep this simple and clean to increase your brand recognition, trust, and conversions.
24. Side ad - A side ad is the ad  that  show up on the right hand side of a search engine results page (SERP).
25. Top ad - A top ad is the ad that shows up in a shaded box above the organic search results.


Setting Up Google AdWords Terms :


1. Campaign - An ad campaign on Google AdWords is made up of your ad groups, and has the same budget, campaign type and your other ad settings. It’s generally what you first set-up when you advertise, and it helps you organize your different paid advertising efforts. You can run multiple campaigns at any time from your Google account.
2. Ad groups - An ad group is your set of keywords, budgets and targeting methods for a particular objective, within the same campaign. For example, if you are running an ad campaign for a shoe sale, you could set up ad groups to target for online sales, women’s shoes and men’s shoes. You can have multiple ads in each ad group.
3. Campaign Type - Your campaign type is where you want your ads to be seen. Google has:
  • “Search Network only” (which means Google search only)
  • “Display Network only” (which means your ad shows up in Google’s Display network of websites, videos, YouTube, Blogger and more. This is also known as AdSense)
  • “Search Network with Display Select” (which is a combo of search and display)
If you have a Google Merchant Center account and want to use Product Listing Ads, you can also choose “Shopping” as a campaign type.
4. Keywords - Keywords are very important in your Google Ads. They are the words or word phrases you choose for your ads, and will help to determine where and when your ad will appear. When choosing your keywords, think like your customer and what they would be searching for when they want your product, service or offer. Though you can include as many as you like, I suggest a maximum of twenty keywords.
Here’s Google’s explanation on how to build the best keyword list:
5. Quality Score - A quality score is the measurement from Google based on the relevancy of your ad headline, description, keywords and destination URL to your potential customer seeing your ad. A higher Quality Score can get you better ad placement and lower costs.
6. Impressions - An impression is the measurement of how many times your ad is shown.
7. Ad Rank - Your Ad Rank is the value that’s used to determine where your ad shows up on a page. It’s based on your Quality Score and your bid amount.
8. Mobile ad - Mobile ads are what your mobile searchers see on their devices. Google AdWords has WAP mobile ads and “ads for high-end mobile devices”.
9. Ad extensions - Ad extensions are extra information about your business, such as your local address, phone number, and even coupons or additional websites. They’re what shows up in blue below your ad descriptions.
General Ad Related Terms


10. Call to Action (CTA) - A CTA is literally the action you want your searcher to take. Good CTAs in your ads are short, action oriented words such as “Buy”, “Get”, “Act Now”, etc.
11. Click Through Rate (CTR) - Your CTR is an important metric in your account settings. It measures how many people who have seen your ad click through to your link destination.
12. Landing Page - Your landing page is the page on your website to which you’re driving traffic from your ad.
13. Optimization - Optimization in Google AdWords is like optimization elsewhere in marketing. It means making the changes in your ad that get you higher results for your objectives.
14. Split Testing - Split testing includes A/B and multivariate testing. It’s a method of controlled marketing experiments with the goal being to improve your objective results (such as higher CTR’s, increased conversion or even better Ad Ranking).
Cost Related Terms


15. Bid Strategy - Your bid strategy is basically how you set your bid type to pay for viewer interaction with your ads.
16. Daily budget - Your daily budget is what you’re willing to spend per day per ad.  Your daily cost is based on a daily average per month, so don’t be alarmed if yours varies from day to day.
17. CPC - Cost-Per-Click is the most common bid type on Google AdWords. It means you pay every time a person actually clicks on your ad. You set your “maximum CPC” in the bidding process, which means that dollar amount is the most you’ll pay for a click on your ad.
18. PPC - Pay-Per-Click is the same as CPC.
19. CPM - Cost-Per-thousand impressions is a bidding method that bases your costs on how many times your ads are shown (impressions).
20. Billing Threshold - Your billing threshold is the level of spending that triggers a charge to you for the ad costs. It applies to automatic payments, and the threshold level starts at $50. It you reach that within 30 days, you’ll be billed, and your threshold then raises to $100 and so on.









Ad Creative Terms   :


21. Headline - Your ad headline is the header of your ad copy.  It generally shows up in blue when your ad is live.
22. Destination URL - Your destination URL is the landing page your ad is directed to when it’s clicked. Your destination site can be a specific page. You can change it for differing ads within ad groups. Your audience does not see it in the ad.
23. Display URL - Your display URL is what shows up in your ad copy. You can keep this simple and clean to increase your brand recognition, trust, and conversions.
24. Side ad - A side ad is the ad  that  show up on the right hand side of a search engine results page (SERP).
25. Top ad - A top ad is the ad that shows up in a shaded box above the organic search results.



About keyword matching options :

(1)Using broad match:

When you use broad match, your ads automatically run on relevant variations of your keywords, even if these terms aren't in your keyword lists. This helps you attract more visitors to your website, spend less time building keyword lists, and focus your spending on keywords that work.
Broad match is the default match type that all your keywords are assigned if you don't specify another match type (exact match, phrase match, or negative match). The Google AdWords system automatically runs your ads on relevant variations of your keywords, including synonyms, singular and plural forms, possible misspellings, stemmings (such as floor andflooring), related searches, and other relevant variations. To help deliver relevant matches, this match type may also take the customer's recent search activities into account.

Example

Broad match keyword:
Ads may show on searches for:
low-carb diet plan
carb-free foods
low-carb diets 
low calorie recipes
Mediterranean diet plans
low-carbohydrate dietary program

How broad match can help you

You can set any or all of your search-targeted keywords to broad match to help you do the following:
·        Spend less time building keyword lists: You don't have to think of every possible keyword variation -- our system does the work for you. That's a time saver, since roughly 20 percent of the searches Google receives each day are ones we haven't seen in at least 90 days. This unpredictable search behavior can make it nearly impossible for you to create a keyword list using only exact match that covers all possible relevant searches.
·        Spend your money on keywords that work: If your ad receives no clicks on a particular keyword variation, our system will quickly stop showing your ads for that and similar search terms. This prevents you from accruing click charges for keyword variations that aren't working and helps you focus on the keywords that work.



(2)Using phrase match:

With phrase match, you can show your ad to customers who are searching for your exact keyword and close variants of your exact keyword, with additional words before or after. Phrase match is more targeted than the default broad match, but more flexible than exact match. It gives you more control over how closely the keyword must match someone's search term so your ad can appear.

How phrase match works 

With phrase match, your ad can appear when people search for your exact phrase, even if they include one or more words before or after it. We'll also show your ad when someone searches for a close variant of your phrase match keyword. Close variants include misspellings, singular and plural forms, acronyms, stemmings (such as floor and flooring), abbreviations, and accents. Word order is important with phrase match, meaning that your ad won’t appear if someone enters an additional word in the middle of your keyword.
Phrase match is more flexible than exact match, but is more targeted than the default broad match option. With phrase match, you can reach more customers, while still showing your ads to customers who are most likely searching for your product or service.

Example

Phrase match keyword:
Ads may show on searches for:
Ads won't show on searches for:
"tennis shoes"
red leather tennis shoes 
buy tennis shoes on sale 
red tenis shoes
shoes for tennis 
tennis sneakers laces



(3)Using exact match:

With exact match, you can show your ad to customers who are searching for your exact keyword, or close variants of your exact keyword, exclusively. Of the four keyword matching options, exact match gives you the most control over who sees your ad, and can result in a higher clickthrough rate (CTR).

How exact match works  :

With exact match, your ads will appear when someone searches for your exact keyword, without any additional words before, after, or in the middle of your keyword. We'll also show your ad when someone searches for close variants of your keyword. Close variants include misspellings, singular and plural forms, acronyms, stemming (such as floor and flooring), abbreviations, and accents.
When you use exact match, you might not receive as many impressions or clicks, but you'll probably see a higher
That's because your ads can appear to people who are searching for terms that are almost exactly related to your product or service.

Example:


Exact match keyword
Ads may show on searches for
Ads won't show on searches for
[tennis shoes]
tennis shoes
tennis shoes
red tennis shoes
buy tennis shoes

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